• Wed. Jun 12th, 2024

Born to run: It’s all in the genes.REALLY?

BySportingEncounter

Apr 22, 2023
www,sportingencounter.com/born-to-run/

It’s a very popular quote that Kenyans are born to run. Kenya runners are a sight to watch while running.

Kenya is a country which is located in East Africa and shares its borders with Tanzania. to the south, Uganda to the west, South Sudan to the northwest, Ethiopia to the north, and Somalia to the east.

In short, it’s a landlocked country in East Africa.

It has a diverse landscape that includes highlands, plains, and coastal regions.

The capital city of Kenya is Nairobi, which is located in the

southern part of the country.

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Train your mind: The body will follow

The human body is an incredibly adaptive mechanism that can respond

to the demands placed upon it.

When we engage in physical training, whether it be strength training or

cardiovascular exercise, our bodies adapt to meet the demands of the activity.

For example, if we lift weights regularly, our muscles will respond by getting

stronger and more efficient at performing the movements required for lifting

 weights. Similarly, if we engage in regular cardiovascular exercise, our hearts

and lungs will adapt to become more efficient at delivering oxygen to our

muscles. In this way, our bodies behave exactly the way we train them to

, and we can improve our physical abilities and overall health through

consistent, targeted training.

www.sportingencounter.com/born-to-run/

What makes Kenya so special for Running

One reason why running is so popular in Kenya is attributed to its

 cultural and economic factors. Running has a long tradition in

certain regions of Kenya, where it is a common mode of

transportation and a way of life.

Many Kenyan runners come

from rural areas where they may have had to run long distances

to attend a school or fetch water, and they may be more likely to

 pursue running as a career, as a result, the country’s

high-altitude training camps, which are located in the western part

 of the country. These training camps are situated at elevations of

7,000 to 8,000 feet above sea level, which can help to increase the

runners’ oxygen uptake and endurance. The thin air at high altitudes

 stimulates the body to produce more red blood cells, which

transport oxygen to the muscles. This increase in oxygen uptake

can help to improve athletic performance, particularly in endurance

 events like long-distance running. As mentioned earlier body is an

intelligent mechanism.

Economic Success Through Running?

Additionally, running can

provide a path to economic success for many Kenyans, who may

 see it as a way to escape poverty and improve their lives.

In summary, Kenya’s high-altitude training camps, cultural factors,

and economic factors all contribute to the country’s success in

long-distance running. While genetics may play a role in the

success of Kenyan runners, environmental and cultural factors

are also important considerations.

It’s all in the genes.

The success of Kenyan runners in long-distance running has been attributed to a

variety of factors, including genetic factors, environmental factors,

and cultural factors.

In terms of genetic factors, some researchers have suggested that Kenyan

runners may have genetic variants that make them well-suited for

 long-distance running. For example, a study published

in the Journal of Applied Physiology in 2005 found that elite Kenyan distance

 runners had a higher percentage of slow-twitch muscle fibres than

 elite runners from other countries, which could give them an advantage

 in endurance events. However, it’s important to note that genetic factors

 alone cannot fully explain the success of Kenyan runners.

Environmental factors may also play a role in the success of Kenyan runners.

 For example, Kenya’s high-altitude training camps may help to increase the

runners’ oxygen uptake and endurance, and the country’s warm climate may

make it easier for them to train year-round.

running as a career as a result.

It ain’t just genes. Skill Matters too.

Let’s quote the classic example of Milkha Singh the Flying Sikh and his own son

 Jeev Milkha Singh.

Milkha Singh (20 November 1929 – 18 June 2021) also known as “The Flying Sikh“, was an Indian track and field sprinter.

He was introduced to running while serving in the Indian Army.

He is the only athlete to win gold at 400 metres at the Asian Games as well as the Commonwealth Games and not to mention the countless times he has won huge accolades for India.

 Jeev Milkha Singh (born 15 December 1971) is an Indian professional golfer who became the first player from India to join the European Tour in 1998.

If Genes are the only reason why Kenyans are good runners for centuries to follow how

Come Jeev Milkha Singh the son of Great Flying Sikh plays Golf and not sprint.

Does he lack the running genes like his father?

It’s possible that Milkha Singh’s son inherited a different set of genes that make him

well-suited for golf, despite his father’s athletic abilities in running.

While genetics can play a role in athletic abilities, it’s important to note that

other factors like training, nutrition, and environmental factors can also impact performance in sports.

DNA analysis can provide insights into genetic factors that may impact athletic

 abilities, including factors like muscle fibre type and oxygen uptake.

 However, it’s not a guarantee of success in a particular sport.

It’s possible for someone to have the genetic makeup that makes them

well-suited for a certain sport but not enjoy or excel in it due to

other factors like personal interests or access to resources.

In the case of Milkha Singh’s son being a golfer, it’s possible that he inherited

a different set of genes that make him well-suited for the sport, such as a

a genetic variant that enhances hand-eye coordination or a tendency towards

slower-twitch muscle fibres that are better suited for endurance-based

activities like golf. However, it’s also likely that he received coaching, training,

 and access to resources that helped him excel in golf, regardless of his genetic

makeup.

In summary, while genetics can play a role in athletic abilities, other factors like training, nutrition, and environmental factors can also impact performance in sports.

Nepotism has no place in sports.

DNA analysis can provide insights into genetic factors that may impact athletic abilities, but it’s not a guarantee of success in a particular sport.

The fact of the matter is you may have the genetic makeup to be a good runner.

But you may not like to run. You probably like to swim.

You are free to do what your heart desires.

It is not a foolproof guarantee if you have the genetic makeup for being a good runner you will become one without training and discipline.

Nobody is born to run.

You may be strong enough to do it you still need to train your body and mind to achieve your place in sports. Nepotism has no place in sports. Even Sachin Tendulkar’s son has to work hard to be a good cricketer.

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